jump to navigation

“So You’re Going on a Mission!” Money Money Money October 9, 2017

Posted by Ubi Dubium in Books, Humor, Responses.
Tags: , , , ,
trackback

My continuing series about the 1968 guidebook for Mormon Missionaries.

Chapter 19, Money Care.

So after dealing with the all-important consideration of scrapbooks, she finally gets around to lesser considerations, like budgets and spending.

“The money a missionary receives from home each month has usually already been tithed so that the missionary will not need to budget for tithing.” (pg 173)

If that were talking about taxes, I’d understand.  But here she is addressing tithing as if it’s a mandatory taxation, and not a voluntary gift made to the church.  That’s a lot of control this church has over their members’ finances, do they send bill collectors if you don’t pay up?

But some of the advice she gives is valuable.  Plan a budget.  Shop in less expensive stores.  Think carefully before splurging, but small expenditures on yourself are OK:

“This is not to say that you need feel guilty about the sacrifice someone is making to keep you on a mission if ever you do spend a few more cents than you need to.  If it’s within reason buy what you want, feel better, and then work hard for an extra hour.  Your parents are sacrificing, true, but they also receive many blessings for your service in the Lord’s work as special bonuses.” (pg 174)

I’d sure like to know what these “special blessings” for the parents are, this sounds pretty vague to me.  Bragging rights at church seems to be about all I can think of.

And some other useful advice: avoid borrowing, and especially never borrow from or lend to their companion.  They have enough tension living with a stranger 24/7, adding a debt to the mix couldn’t help matters.

She includes the usual cautions about not carrying much cash (travellers’ checks were the option of choice before the days of credit cards), having a moderate reserve available for initial equipment, and leaving any large amounts safely in the bank at home.

She’s included a lengthy section about how a family can send money to their missionary, most of which is now outdated information about money orders and the like, so I’ll skip it.  The one thing that I would think is still relevant is that the local mission president can assist in money transfers.  But their involvement could also mean that they can hold up money meant for a missionary, which gives them a lot of power.  Also hovering over the missionary:

“Missionaries who receive honorable releases will have their returning transportation paid by the church.”(pg 175)

Which means that a missionary who decides he’s had enough and wants to quit is on his own for paying for his trip back.  He could wind up stranded in a foreign country without the money to get home.  That’s a strong motivation for a missionary who has realized that he no longer believes in what he’s doing to pretend that he still does, at least until he gets home.

And last, our author finally gets around to where the money for the mission is coming from.  Because even though these kids are being sent out to make a two-year recruiting pitch for the church, and even though Mormons are already expected to give 10% of their income to the church, the church isn’t paying for these kids’ expenses.

“Now where does the money come from? Usually it’s the missionary’s parents who pay for the mission with occasional contributions from a brother, uncle, grandmother, or other family member.  Occasionally a mother goes to work to earn the extra money needed to maintain a missionary in the field.”(pg 178)

(Gasp!  A working mother? Clutch my pearls!)

“Once in a while when parents are not financially able to support their missionary, the responsibility is assumed by a priesthood quorum.  Even milkmen have been known to share the burden (and blessings) by contributing free milk to the missionary’s family during his absence.” (pg 178)

The milkman?  There’s those mysterious “blessings” again, I’d like to ask some Mormons what exactly the benefits of these “blessings” are.  And isn’t it nice of the church to fund their salesman when the family can’t?

She suggests that a missionary save up money by working the summer before he leaves, or “…by selling his car or other possessions such as a musical instrument or ham radio set.”(pg 178)  I really think it’s not OK to expect a kid to sell off something that’s a big part of his life and makes him happy, so that he can afford to sacrifice two years of his life as an unpaid salesman.  Leave him at least some of his own individuality please!

And last, she suggests that the missionary fund should be started early:

“Even a child of five or six years old can begin popping pennies into a piggy bank labeled “Money for my Mission” and then when he is old enough to start earning money, the savings can be more substantial.  …  He can’t help but appreciate his mission more when he is helping to pay for it.” (pg 178-9)

That last part is true.  Humans do value things more highly when they have worked hard to achieve them.

“Of course, should unforeseen circumstances arise which prevent him from being called on a mission, such a fund is not wasted: the money can always be used for a college education, for getting set up in a business, for getting married, or as a lifelong emergency fund.” (pg 179)

You know, actually useful things.

Previous Chapter                                                               Next Chapter→

Comments»

1. “So You’re Going on a Mission!” Money Money Money – Christians Anonymous - October 9, 2017

[…] Posted by Ubi Dubium in Books, Humor, Responses. Tags: books, christianity, missionaries, money, Mormonstrackback […]

Liked by 1 person

2. jimin - December 5, 2017

The piggy bank at 5 or 6 is also a good, steady indoctrination pushing the parents excited belief system on the kids.

Liked by 2 people

3. jimin - December 5, 2017

This blog really hits a home run from my perspective. I was living a lot of this. I had ptsd last night reading Sam young last night about masturbation interviews. Lol!

Liked by 2 people


Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: