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“So You’re Going on a Mission!” Journals October 8, 2017

Posted by Ubi Dubium in Books, Humor, Responses.
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(Another installment of the continuing series on the 1968 guidebook for Missionaries I found at a used book sale.)

Chapter 18, Journal Care

“First let’s jump several years into your future.  Your mission, “the greatest experience of my life,” is now buried deep beneath diploma, job, bills, and babies.  Was it all a dream?” (pg  163)

If going on this mission was a greater life experience than having children, you’re doing it wrong, and probably should not be having children.  But on to her topic this chapter, which is about documenting every moment of this two-year recruiting project.

I think that if our author were around today, she would be into scrapbooking.  Really into scrapbooking.  Because in this section on journals, instead of just saying something like “It’s a good idea, do it if you have the time, later you’ll be glad you did,” she goes into excruciating detail about this.  She goes over all the excuses not to, and pooh-poohs those.  She looks at things like how often to write in it, or what form it should be in, and lays out the pros and cons of every single option.

Should the missionary write daily, or weekly?  Should he include the entries in his letters home, or bring loose-leaf paper with him that will become the journal pages, or tape record his thoughts to transcribe later?  He could send clippings and photos home to his girlfriend for her to compile for him, but what if they break up?  She lays out carefully detailed lists of advantages and disadvantages for each option for timing and format. Oh, dear, this is so complicated!

She has twelve quotes from past missionaries about how their journals came up short, and what they wish they had done differently, and several lengthy examples of writing from actual journals, with examples of insufficient and good entries.

And of course she suggests making a scrapbook, but finally there is some acknowledgement that these kids are already too overworked to have time for that:

“While the missionary himself will not have time to make the actual scrapbook, he must constantly be alert for appropriate materials which he can send home to whoever will be doing the compiling” (pg 170-171)

Of course there’s no consideration given to the idea that the missionary might want to do their own compiling after they get home, because maybe it’s possible that a 20-year-old male might actually enjoy that!

“HINT: If you want to play it absolutely safe, ask your mother or sister to make your scrapbook for you.  While it gives a girl friend or fiancé something to do and helps her to feel useful and participating, you do run the risk of not gaining possession of your scrapbook should you break up either during your mission or afterwards.  Or you might possibly share the fate of one elder who was presented his scrapbook on his return, but every place where there had been a picture of his girl friend, now there appeared only a gaping hole.” (pg 172)

And continuing with the obsessive detail of this chapter she has a numbered list of thirty-three items from one missionaries scrapbook, as an example.

I will say that, back before the internet and Facebook, keeping a journal while on a big trip was an excellent idea.  I went on a month-long tour of Europe with my choir when I was in college, and I kept a journal of the trip, a spiral notebook that I wrote in, mostly during the endless bus rides.  When I got home, I was of course exhausted and ready to sleep for about two days solid.  But people immediately wanted to know “How was your trip?”  So I could hand them my journal, say “Read this” and go off to sleep.  I wish I still had that journal, but it disappeared about a week after I got back.  A shame, because I had been sitting next to cartoonist Ned Riddle on the plane, who had drawn his “Mr Tweedy” character on one page for me.

So is this missionary scrapbooking still a thing now?  You’d think what with Facebook and Pinterest and such that it might have declined.  But remember, missionaries aren’t allowed to use the internet, or even have a computer with them.  So no Facebook, no tweeting, no real-time updates for friends and family.  A quick google brought up a ton of websites offering scrapbook materials for missionaries, so it looks like this is still a big thing for them.  I even found a Mormon Wiki page where they take credit for the whole modern scrapbooking industry.

Next up, money!

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1. “So You’re Going on a Mission” Journals – Christians Anonymous - October 8, 2017

[…] Posted by Ubi Dubium in Books, Humor, Responses. Tags: books, christianity, journals, missionaries, Mormons, scrapbookstrackback […]

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