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“So You’re Going on a Mission!” Food Safety August 11, 2016

Posted by Ubi Dubium in Books, Humor, Responses.
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Continuing with the 1968 guidebook for prospective Mormon missionaries.

Chapter 8, Food Care

This is rather a long chapter, and includes some useful information. For example, it includes an English-metric conversion chart for measurements.  If I were travelling overseas and needed to cook there, that’s something I could still use today.

Since the missionaries will be on limited food budgets, there’s quite a bit of advice on buying less expensive foods, and how to avoid wasting food.  And, as usual, there’s the usual harping on cleaning up everything.

But one of the main themes of the chapter is:

“One sick elder means two incapacitated elders, because one does not proselyte alone: therefore as a consideration both to yourself and your companion, take every precaution in the preparation of all food and drink which is to enter your body.” (pg 70)

So let’s see how our author does on food safety advice.

“B grade or cracked eggs are just as good for scrambling and general cooking as are the A grade” (pg 64)

survey says

Cracked eggs are likely to be contaminated with salmonella.  Cracked eggs should always be thrown out.

“If you are going to fry something rather than bake it, use butter, olive oil, bacon fat, or shortening.  Margarine is not satisfactory because it burns easily.” (pg 67)

survey sayssurvey says

Butter has solids in it that can burn, and isn’t very good for serious frying (like deep frying) unless you use clarified butter.  Margarine is not acceptable because it usually has a fairly high water content, and will spatter as the water boils off.  The various kinds of vegetable oil are cheap and great for frying, but are not mentioned.

“HINT: if you have a fat flare-up in a skillet, extinguish it with dry baking soda.” (pg 67)

survey sayssurvey sayssurvey says

If you have a grease fire in a pan, first turn off your stove and put a lid on your pan.  Baking soda is only useful in putting out small fires, anyway.

“There are many foods, however, which need to be cooled quickly and refrigerated rather than being permitted to stand several hours at room temperature.  Some of these are … potato salad, … and anything containing salad dressing.” (pg 70)

survey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey says

Mayonnaise actually slows spoilage.  So does anything with a good amount of vinegar in it, like salad dressing.  If something is going to spoil from being left out, it’s from the other ingredients in it, not the mayo.

“Always take the meat out of the market paper and rewrap it in wax paper with ends open so the meat can breathe” (pg 71)

survey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey says

Meat doesn’t need to “breathe.”  That’s for fresh vegetables and wine.  Meat with the ends left open will dry out, and can pick up whatever bacteria and spores floating around your fridge. Plus, re-wrapping adds germs from your hands, which are one of the biggest sources of bacteria in the kitchen.  Leaving it in the original wrapping until you are ready to use it minimizes the potential for contamination.

“When milk is on the verge of turning sour, sweeten it by adding a bit of baking soda” (pg 72)

survey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey sayssurvey says

The acid taste of milk that has begun to spoil can indeed be neutralized with a little baking soda.  But that doesn’t change the fact that your milk has begun to spoil.  Using that milk in baked goods would be better than drinking it, so the baking heat can kill off the bacteria.

Actually, apart from these mistakes, what jumped out of me is what information on food safety was missing from the chapter, which is a lot.  There’s no discussion at all of what kind of cookware is appropriate to use for what foods (except a recommendation for pressure cookers, with no caution about how those can be dangerous if you don’t know how to use them). Nothing about keeping pan handles turned so that you can’t knock into them, or about using potholders.  Nothing about how to select and use knives to avoid cutting yourself with them.  Nothing about how you should have a fire extinguisher in your kitchen.

And there’s a long paragraph about washing your hands, washing your vegetables, keeping your work area clean, disinfecting your dishtowels, etc. etc.  But there is no explanation at all about cross-contamination, or how to avoid it.   This chapter should have said “Don’t put your cooked meat back on the plate that just had your raw meat on it.  Don’t cut vegetables for salad on the cutting board where you prepared raw meat.  Anything that touches raw meat needs to be thoroughly cleaned before it touches anything else.”   This is kind of a basic thing, butis something that I would not expect a 19-year-old to know.

This is long enough for now, so next post I’ll come back to this same chapter, and we’ll talk about what the missionaries might actually be eating!

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